Sponsorship

  1. 1
    Dependent Child Sponsorship
    You can sponsor a dependant child or a child you plan to adopt for Permanent Residency in Canada. Currently, the eligible age for a dependant is 18 or younger, however the government of Canada have been considering to increase the age to 21 or younger sometime in the near future.

    You can sponsor if you are:

    Requirements for sponsored child

    • Dependent child is 21 years old or younger, and not married or in a common-law relationship.  This law was changed on May 3rd, 2017 and will take effect on October 24, 2017– the dependant age was previously 18 and younger.  If your application is still pending or you have currently have your PR and would like to sponsor a dependant under these new rules, you can.
    • If dependent child is 22 or older, they must satisfy one of the following in order to be considered a dependant:
    • they have been an on-going full-time student since before the age of 22 and are  financially dependent on the support of the parents
    • they were married or in a common-law relationship before they were 22
    • suffer from a physical or mental disability and has been financially dependent on the support of the parents since before the age of 22

    Requirements for the nature of the relationship

    • The child is the biological child of the parent and has not been adopted by another person

    OR ​

    • The child is adopted by the parent
  2. 2
    Orphaned Relatives

    You can sponsor other relatives besides your immediate family members under certain circumstances

    You can sponsor:

    • Your brother, sister, nephew, niece, grandson or granddaughter, who are orphaned, under the age of 18, and not married or in a common-law relationship
    • another relative if youdo not have a spouse, common-law partner, or conjugal partner, or one of the following living relatives below (excluding the person you wish to sponsor) which you could sponsor instead:
      • a child
      • a mother or father
      • brother or sister
      • uncle or aunt
      • nephew or niece

    AND:

    • you do not have any of the relatives mentioned above who:
    • is a Canadian citizen, permanent resident, Indian (Native, registered under the Indian Act)
    • have an application for permanent residence that is being currently processed

    You can sponsor if you are:

    • At least 18 years of age
    • A Canadian permanent resident living in Canada or a Canadian citizen
    • Not in prison, bankrupt, under a removal order (if a permanent resident) or charged with a serious offence
    -Other Relatives

    You can sponsor other relatives besides your immediate family members under certain circumstances

    You can sponsor:

    • Your brother, sister, nephew, niece, grandson or granddaughter, who are orphaned, under the age of 18, and not married or in a common-law relationship
    • another relative if youdo not have a spouse, common-law partner, or conjugal partner, or one of the following living relatives below (excluding the person you wish to sponsor) which you could sponsor instead:
      • a child
      • a mother or father
      • brother or sister
      • uncle or aunt
      • nephew or niece

    AND:

    • you do not have any of the relatives mentioned above who:
    • is a Canadian citizen, permanent resident, Indian (Native, registered under the Indian Act)
    • have an application for permanent residence that is being currently processed

    You can sponsor if you are:

    • At least 18 years of age
    • A Canadian permanent resident living in Canada or a Canadian citizen
    • Not in prison, bankrupt, under a removal order (if a permanent resident) or charged with a serious offence
  3. 3
    Parent and Grandparent Sponsorship

    Changes to the Parental Draw for 2019

    The IRCC has made changes to the Parental Sponsorship program once again. It has moved from a draw to a first come, first served model.

    On January 28, 2019 at 12 noon EST the interest to sponsor form will open.

    • You must be a Canadian Citizen or Permanent Resident
    • You must be 18 years of age or older
    • You must meet or exceed the minimum necessary incomerequirement for Family Sponsorship
    • You must sign an undertaking agreement that commits you to provide financial support for your sponsored parents or grandparents and repay any provincial social assistance benefits paid to the sponsored family members for 20 years.
    • If the sponsor lives in Quebec, an additional undertaking agreement must be signed

    Sponsors must provide Notices of Assessment from the CRA to IRCC to prove that they meet the minimum necessary income requirement.

    If you do not qualify for Parental PR sponsorship because you do not meet the MNI for the 3 year period, you can apply for a Super Visa as the income required is only for 1 year and it is about 30% lower.  Read more about Super Visa.

    Family MembersMNI
    2018
    MNI
    2017
    MNI
    2016
    2 persons$40,379$39,813$39,371
    3 persons$49,64148,945$48,404
    4 persons$60,271$59,426$58,768
    5 persons$68,358$67,400$66,654
    6 persons$77,095$76,015$75,174
    7 persons$85,835$84,631$83,695
    Each additional person$8,876$8,616$8,522
  4. 4
    Sponsorship a Family member

    Spousal Sponsorship

    Processing times on average are between 8 to 12 months, depending on the visa office responsible for processing the application. Some larger visa offices such as the USA can process applications as fast as 4 to 6 months.
    All applications for both Inland and Outland Sponsorship are submitted to CPC-M in Mississauga. Once an application is deemed to be complete with all required forms and documents, and the sponsor is eligible, the application is forwarded for further processing. Incomplete applications are returned 3 months later.

    There are 2 types of applications for Spouse and Common-Law Sponsorship

    • Outland Spousal Sponsorship: your application will be processed through the visa office in the sponsored spouse’s country of citizenship or where they legally reside (if outside Canada).  If you and your Spouse/Common-law partner live together in Canada, you can still apply under this category.  Applying under this category will make you eligible to Appeal a refusal. You will not have rights to appeal for an Inland Spousal Application.
    • Inland Spousal Sponsorship(Spouse or Common-Law in-Canada category): your application will be processed in Canada and you and your sponsor MUST live together.  The person being sponsored MUST have temporary status in Canada as a worker, student, or visitor.  The person being sponsored may be eligible for an Open Work Permit.

     * Important information on Refused Spousal Sponsorship applications

    You can sponsor the following persons and their dependent children (21 or younger) for Canadian Permanent Residence

    • Spouse(husband, wife, partner- marriage must be legally recognized)
    • Common-law Partner(person you are living with but not married to)
    • Conjugal Partner(if your partner does not qualify under the Spouse or Common-Law category but you are in a committed relationship equal to that of a marriage for at least 1 year. There must be extenuating circumstances why you cannot live together- job location, studying abroad, inability to obtain visa to Canada are NOT good enough reasons)
    Canada recognizes same-sex marriages and partners and are eligible to apply under these 3 categories.

    To be eligible to be a Sponsor

    • You must be a Canadian Citizen, or Permanent Resident (living in Canada)
    • You must be 18 years of age or older
    • You cannot be in prison, bankrupt, under a removal order (if a permanent resident) or charged with a serious offence
    • You, yourself, cannot have been sponsored to Canada as a spouse within the last 5 years.

    To be eligible to be sponsored by a Sponsor

    • You must be at least 18 years of age
    • You must not be too closely related by blood to the Sponsor

    Requirements that must be met in order to qualify for Sponsorship under the 3 categories

    • Your relationship is genuine (real) and was not entered into primarily for the purpose of acquiring Permanent Residence
    • If your spouse or common-law partner is applying in the Spouse or Common-law Partner “In Canada class”,he or she must cohabit (live) with you in Canada

    Requirements AFTER sponsorship

    • The sponsor is financially responsible for the person sponsored for three years after the sponsored person becomes a permanent resident.
    • Individuals who come to Canada as spouses are themselves barred from sponsoring a spouse in turn for five years after receiving Canadian permanent residence.
    • * This requirement has been removed as of April 28, 2017: A two-year “legitimate relationship” regulation applies to spouses/partners who have been in a relationship for two years or less and who have no children in common at the time of application submission. Once in Canada, the sponsored person must live with their spouse/partner in a “legitimate relationship” for two years or face the possibility of having their permanent residency revoked. Exceptions will be made for sponsored spouses or partners who are suffering from abuse or neglect.
  5. 5
    Super Visa Refusal
    Super Visas and Visitor Visas get refused often. There are many reasons for refusal, depending which country a person is a citizen of: visa-exempt or non-visa exempt country.
    Every Visitor (Super Visa included) requires travel authorization to board a plane and travel to Canada; this is in the form of either an eTA or a TRV. This is the most important part of the visa application process and when an individual is refused a visa (visitor visa, super visa, student visa, work visa), it is as a result of not getting either an eTA or TRV approved.

    Visa-exempt countries only require an eTA (electronic travel authorization) which typically is easy to obtain. Non-visa exempt countries, however, require a TRV (Temporary Resident Visa) which is a much more thorough screening process and have a much higher rate of refusal- especially when individuals apply on their own. Typical processing times for TRV visas can be between 2 weeks to 4 months, depending on the visa office that is responsible for processing.

    Common Reasons for Refusal

    TRV Visa: non-visa exempt countries

    A TRV visa is a type of travel authorization, much like the eTA.  Individuals from non-visa exempt countries require a TRV visa in their passport before they are allowed to board a plane at an airport.  The Canadian government has placed many countries on a non-visa exempt list to ensure individuals are screened properly before being permitted to travel to Canada.

    The TRV visa application process is a lengthy one. The application asks for plenty of detailed personal and family information. In addition, many documents must be provided to strengthen and support the application. Unlike US visas that have an interview, Canada’s screening process is only done by a paper application with no interview. It is extremely important to prepare a strong application as the visa officer will make a decision solely based on the information provided in the application; they will not request any additional information.
    Many individuals do not understand the process and there is a high rate of refusal when an individual applies on their own. After receiving a refusal, the individual has been flagged and any subsequent application must be as strong as possible in order to have any chance of approval.

    TRV visas are refused for many reasons.  They are refused for all the same refusal reasons as an eTA (see below), plus an additional 12 reasons which normally only apply to the screening process for TRV applications.

    Reasons for TRV and Super Visa refusal:

    • Lack of Travel History: If a person has not travelled anywhere outside of their home country before, they will be refused a visa if they apply on their own.  Our firm can overcome this reason by making legal arguments and referencing a Federal Court Case in the application.
    • Strong Family Ties to Canada:having family members in Canada can be a reason for refusal, and individual applying on their own can be refused.  Our firm can overcome this reason by making legal arguments and referencing a Federal Court Case in the application.
    • Length of stay:Individuals who state on the application they wish to stay for a longer period, usually require significant financial funds.
    • Real Purpose of Visit: there wasn’t a good enough explanation of the reason for travel to Canada.
    • Lack of Employment Prospects in Home Country
    • Current Employment Situation
    • Personal Assets
    • Host in Canada financial situation: lack of documentation
    • Documents that do no appear authentic
    • History of overstaying status on a previous visit to Canada
    • Illegal Status in Country of Residence
    • Other Reasons
    eTA (electronic Travel Authorization) visa: visa-exempt countries

    Individuals from visa-exempt countries are usually refused on grounds of inadmissibility:

    • Criminality(having previously been charged with a crime)
    • Misrepresentation(having misrepresented information to Canada immigration previously and received a ban)
    • Previous Deportation: for overstaying visit illegally
    • Medical Inadmissibility: have a contagious disease that is a threat to Canadians
    • Human Rights Violations: previously served in the military for a country that has been deemed to have participated in war crimes.  Additional documents must be provided to overcome this inadmissibility.
  6. 6
    Super Visa

    Super Visa

    A great way to bring Parents and Grandparents to Canada is through the Super Visa program. This program allows family members to come to Canada as long-term visitors on a multiple entry visa that may last up to 10 years. A Super Visa is valid for 2 years before it has to be renewed. This is an ideal option for Canadian Citizens and Canadian Permanent Residents who are waiting to sponsor their parents for PR, or who currently do not qualify for Parental PR sponsorship. The financial requirement for a Super Visa is less strict than PR sponsorship- the minimum necessary income (MNI) is 30% lower than that of PR sponsorship, and only 1 year of gross income must exceed the MNI vs 3 years with PR Sponsorship.

    To be eligible for a Super Visa:

    • The sponsor must meet the minimum necessary income (for Super Visa) requirement, and provide the most recent Canadian tax return (Notice of assessment) where line 150 meets or exceeds this amount.
    • Purchase Canadian healthcare insurance of $100,000 coverage for at least 1 year- check the cost for insurance here. (approximately $2,000 – $3,000 CAD per year).
    • Complete a medical examination
    • A written commitment of financial support from the Sponsor (child or grandchild) must be provided

    Depending on the citizenship of the sponsored person, a TRV (Temporary Resident Visa)may also be required for non visa-emempt countires.  If a TRV is required, please be advised that there is a rigorous screening process and there is a high rate of refusal when individuals apply on their own.  To find out if a TRV is required, refer to the list of TRV required countries.  In addition, refer to the common reasons for refusal of a TRV visa.

    Minimum Necessary Income to sponsor for Super Visa in 2018:

    Family MembersMNI 2017
    2 persons$31,061
    3 persons$38,185
    4 persons$46,362
    5 persons$52,583
    6 persons$59,304
    7 persons$66,027
    Each additional person$6,723
     
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    In SEP Immigration company we are dedicated to ensuring that you meet Canadian immigration requirements.

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